Be your digital self …

We all have at least one digital self, something representing us to engage in the technological world. Initially this may just be information about us and related data. But at some point, in time this digital footprint will learn and adopt our behaviors and become active.
We may have multiple digital selves – genuine and facades. The genuine self is the one which learns directly from our behaviors and mirrors our social identity. The facades are tailored for specific situations or may try to protect the genuine self.
The genuine digital self will become a mirror of you – most likely knowing more about you than you do yourself.
Is the genuine digital self a legal subject or just acting on behalf? Our genuine digital self will be able to act much faster considering more information than we can – if allowed. We must consider the level of responsibility and accountability on our physical self for what it does. Should this begin with a form of parent child relation and to evolve becoming a legal subject over time.  This evolved relationship enables the digital citizen to grow and learn over time to become of full legal age at some point.
Ethical standards for digital selves will become increasingly important – humans have ethical basic patterns which are inherited and part of the DNA. Before digital selves become widely adopted and increasing active, digital self will require such standards.
We will, as part of the evolution, need to revisit our standards of privacy. Are we able to pause our digital self and what would be the impact and disruption to our digital ecosystem?  Digital self-editing may sound funny but may soon become a serious issue when others detect discrepancies and lead to distrust. Observed digital selves – you observed by others – can be used to validate information or complement it. So, you need to become more yourself – which for most people is not a big issue.
We need to evolve our perspective of what we treat and define as sensitive information during this journey. Fundamental attributes such as name, birth date or social security number will be increasingly hard to protect. So, we will need to change the way how we see personal information during this journey. Many legacy constructs like credit card numbers are not suitable for the digital age and must be replaced – this is the essence of the ‘digital transformation’.
Obviously, the digital self needs to be well secured and protected. This includes integrity, availability and confidentiality. Initially you will be responsible to keep your true digital self secure. But at some point, this will change and your digital self starts to protect you – two evolutionary states of digital self defense.
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November on FINthinkers

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November 2017 was the first month for the FINthinkers blog. Below is a short summary of what covered so far
Change
Our blog started with Change is inevitable looking at diverse types of change ranging from evolution to revolution. We also touched on Conway’s Law which states that organizations designing systems are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations. Following Conway’s law companies need to change the organization to create the systems required to stay relevant in the new normal. In Next stop – FinTechGiants ? we look at the available dimensions to outperform others and at the relevant structures which each company has. Many companies seem to apply a Tur Tur strategy to change looking giant from far away but very small if one gets closely.
Client Experience and Brand
Noisy Channel(s) to Channel-less highlights the need to think from the client’s perspective. No client talks about channels but we all like to have seamless and ubiquitous experience to reach the desired outcomes. So brand’s digital behaviour becomes vital when services are transparent in a digitally augmented world.
Security
Homomorphic Encryption started a series of posts on security and related topics.
We hope that the posts inspired you to think about the topics. The nest posts will follow soon … thanks for reading.

 

Digital Tur Tur

Be aware of signs of Mr. Tur Tur

Let me begin with a German children’s novel written by Michael Ende. Lummerland is the home to Jim Button and Luke the engine driver. On one of their adventures Luke and Jim gain a new friend, the giant Mr. Tur Tur. He is an apparent giant and only appears giant in size from far away but is normal when being close.

The apparent giant is of course an allegory – one that often comes to my mind when having discussions or reading about digital transformation. Many of the declared digitization strategies seem like Mr. Tur Tur in nature. The way things are presented and promoted as part of digital transformation initiatives seem impressive from a distance – labs established, digital officers nominated, technology declared to be multi speed, problems to be solved via agile and innovation formalized. But upon looking closer, not so much has really changed.

Digitization is about rethinking value propositions from the core based on digital paradigms with the clients in focus. The generated revenues reflect the result of excellent value propositions. These value propositions must fit not just into any but into the client’s networked world. Digitisation necessitates the redefinition of the core value propositions and transformation of the business model. A high degree of automation and digital assets are qualities of such a model, but a high automation of processes or the replacement of paper with web forms do not imply successful digitisation.

Many value propositions will become ubiquitous as they happen behind the scenes transparently integrated to create the outcomes desired by the client. This will happen though the integration of interfaces to services into user journeys or skills into client’s personal smart assistants. Highly scalable and continuously available interfaces, also known as, APIs are key building blocks to enabling these impending capabilities.

To brace the digitisation journey, a company must encompass all dimensions of skills, organization and technology (see Next stop – FinTechGiants ?). To date only a few incumbent companies have approached the challenge and adopted its fundamental way. Rule of thumb indicates that incomes erode by 50% while a dominating player emerges during the digital transformation of an industry. The question for digital laggards becomes how long they can sustain against the trend in the market – trying to catch up does not work. Agility and scalability are imperative and key to survive in the digital world – qualities that must be regained or even re-learned by many organizations.

Look out and be aware of signs of Mr. Tur Tur in your environment. Digitisation requires fundamental changes and cannot be achieved incrementally – underestimating them or creating a perception through marketing campaigns will impede and be detrimental to your business.

Conway’s Law – Change or Fail?

We were recently discussing Conway’s Law in the context of the ongoing transition towards solutions which are digital in their core. The law is named after programmer Melvin Conway who first introduced it in 1967 and said: ‘ organizations which design systems … are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations.’  If Conway is right, then this means that implementing a new inherently digital solution requires organizations to change structures or at least their ways to communicate.  Sounds like change is inevitable … 
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Change is inevitable ….

Evolution, tranformation or beginning revolution – open your mind, think and act!

Change is the only constant. Have you thought about the types of changes we are experiencing now? Is it evolutionary, transformational or even the coming of a revolution?
  • Evolution – the gradual development or formation of
  • Transformation – a dramatic change of state of being
  • Revolution – a dramatic and wide-reaching change in conditions, attitudes, or current establishment
Today many use the term ‘digital transformation‘ to mean the transformation of the current state into a state which is digital in its core. A state where information is continuously collected, exchanged and analyzed allowing to create smart and interconnected products which adapt and learn.
Some refer to the ‘4th industrial revolution‘ and mean a fundamental and wide reaching change affecting the life of all of us, the society and its values. What happens when smart machines perform the work and humans have time? Do we then focus on our intrinsic motivation? It is clear that many of the paradigms and trained thinking patterns we are used to immediately become invalid.
If you look around and open up your mind – enabling you to notice what you belief is possible – thus you then sense that we are probably quite close to a revolution where many things we consider as naturally given today will be replaced by a new normal.
  • Start by looking at a one example: self-driving electric cars and its implications. Soon we will transition from car ownership to co-sharing where you pay per use via a simply request which matches your current needs. There is no need for personal parking spaces or garages; With connected self driving cars, there will be substantially transformation of current governance and road infrastructure, less cars and accidents; insurances business model will need to be different.
  • Other additional examples to ponder upon such as the increase in automation or the on-demand replication of goods and imagine how the implications of these scenarios interfere and influence each other.
The changes are combinatorial and the consequences are profound and complex. They will most likely happen much faster than expected once its trigger point is reached.
Are we really in a transformation or at the beginning of a revolution?   Are you ready for the change? Are we ready for the change? Is your company making the future happen or busy running a red queen’s race?

 

Change happens …. change is happening …. progress in optional